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A guide to CAPTCHA

07 June 2017

CAPTCHA, 'Completely Automated Public Turing Tests to Tell Computers and Humans Apart', is a tool used on websites, featuring a challenge/response test that humans can pass but bots fail, to ensure that user input has not been generated by a computer.

The problem with CAPTCHA is that it causes difficulties when users of assistive technology try to use it, and in the most inaccessible versions, can prevent users from completing the verification process. This blog post explores the barriers faced by users of assistive technology when they encounter a CAPTCHA, and some alternatives to consider when implementing security on a website.

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